Blue Grass Pastures by Paul Starrett Sample

Blue Grass Pastures

In an effort to track down more information about this charming print, I called the C&O Historical Society. They were incredibly friendly and helpful, and here’s what they said:”The print appears to be of one of the paintings that was commissioned by the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway for use in the new cars on their post-war streamliner that was to be instituted between Washington and Cincinnati for daylight travel from serving the major cities along that route, but to primarily to provide convenient daylight arrival at White Sulphur Springs, WV to serve guests of The Greenbrier, C&O’s famous resort. The train was to be called The Chessie and while its equipment was all built and delivered to the C&O in 1948, the passenger train market was drastically changing, with air travel coming into favor, and the train was never actually operated as intended. Some of the equipment served on C&O for a short period, as they waited delivery for other new equipment that was designed to modernize their other long-distance mainline passenger trains. Eventually almost all of the cars from the 1948 group were sold to other railroads and served well into the 1970s and even went into Amtrak service in 1971.

Generally,each of the coaches built for The Chessie, had a display case incorporated in its interior to contain and exhibit original paintings of scenes along the C&O route that the train would travel. The Paul Sample painting was one of those pieces of art. C&O had art prints, suitable for framing, produced for all of the paintings in the collection and they were available to persons who were interested in obraining them. Whether they were sold or provided as gifts, I am not certain, and I am not sure how many were produced. The B&O Museum in Baltimore sold prints in their gift shop in the late 1960s and 70s.”

The question remains: Where is the original?

As of today, this post is the only record in cyberland of this particular work by Sample.

Trawling for Treasures in Coral Gables

One recent Saturday in Coral Gables found me at a garage sale close to the University of Miami campus. The sale was being run by two sisters in their 80s, and one of their daughters. The women were Southern and had all of the charm you would expect. From what I gathered, their husbands had passed, as they were selling men’s clothes along with their colorful clothing, various furniture and other fabulous items. I bought a few things and returned the next day to check it out again. On the second day, I grabbed up some fabulous designer clothes (one of the sisters was quite the entertainer in her day) and various items. As I was leaving, one of the sisters directed me to a couple of wood balusters. “My husband and I bought these over 50 years ago when they were tearing down an old mansion in Charlotte,” she explained. “We planned to make them into lamps and he even sanded them down to get them ready…” she trailed off.
The home she was talking about was the Edward Dilworth Latta mansion which was demolished in 1965. These heart pine balusters are bulky, heavy and pretty fabulous in their simplicity. She was worried that no one would take them and strongly suggested I fulfill their plan to make them into lamps. I couldn’t guarantee I would, naturally, but I’m a sucker for provenance and after agreeing on a price I brought them home. I reached out to an architectural salvage company in Charlotte later that week but they were not interested. So the question becomes, “What do I do with them now?”

Edward Dilworth Latta Mansion Balusters

Edward Dilworth Latta Mansion Balusters

Edward Dilworth Latta Mansion

Edward Dilworth Latta Mansion

Climbing the Cates-Benson (Bengtsson) Family Tree

I have done a lot of work on my family tree since my grandfather died a couple of years ago. Naturally, I wish I’d asked him a thousand more questions but didn’t. So I sorted out family photos and set out to figure out their subjects. It’s been so much fun and I’ve met some terrific cousins in my search.
I’m a visual person, so my work started by trying to lay out the photos in an order that made sense to my family line – so I created a visual family tree. This way, I could figure out who came from who.

My Cates Benson Trout Endicott Halsey Camron Family Tree

My Cates Benson Trout Endicott Halsey Camron Family Tree

Goldberg Surfside Estate Art

In March, I went to an estate sale in Surfside, where I bought a (baby) painting and two (dog) charcoals signed by Goldberg. I think the artist was a family member. The estate was left to charity, so there was no family to collect these works. Along with the pieces, I also got a family photo album that gave them at least a little provenance (one or more articles in the album mentioned the Goldberg name).
I think they’re cute and figure they must have been important to someone to have been kept for so long. One of these days I’ll figure out where to display them.

Poor baby

Poor baby

Puppies 01

Puppies 01

Puppies 02

Puppies 02

Weekends Find Me Finding Weekend Finds

I like to share info about them because, well, I like to brag. I also get frustrated when there’s no information on the web about my treasures. I mean, really? NO ONE else has ever come across a Gold Medal Room Divider before? It can’t have been the ONLY one EVER made! So I share. And hope.

Gold Medal Folding Furniture Co., Racine, Wis.

Gold Medal Folding Furniture Co., Racine, Wis.